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Perspectives

9

Everyday Securitization: Prevention and Preemption in British Counter-Terrorism

By Tom Pettinger

The Prevent program tries to stop people becoming drawn into, supporting, or engaging in violence based on twenty-two supposed “signs of radicalization.”[4] The program has moved through several different iterations, focusing, in its early years, specifically on Muslim communities who were targeted with explicit funding, to a whole-of-society approach where specific community work has become less overt.

Preventing Extremism and Terrorism: Reporting on an Intervention in Secondary Schools

By Raymond SlotFrans Van AsscheSérgio Vieira, and Joana Vieira dos Santos

One specific psychological approach to understand the terrorist is not feasible, as terrorists differ widely in motivation, conviction, and objective. Consequently, trying to identify or profile terrorists within the general population based on psychological characteristics is a difficult task.

Britain First: Banned on Facebook but not Solved

By Lella Nouri

How do groups like Britain First use social media, and how does this result in such unprecedented popularity? Does social media bring out xenophobia in British society? Is Britain First really that popular? Is this thanks to its online strategy; and if so, what is their secret?

Mapping the Radical Right in Hungary

By Katherine Kondor

In a political environment so influenced by radical right elites, the number of radical right street-level and direct-action organizations is notable. Derivatively, in a county whose political atmosphere is becoming increasingly radicalized, on what grounds do radical right activist groups stand? In what way have the attitudes and aims of radical right street movements shifted in reflecting this change?

Between the “Street” and the “Salon,” the Local and the National: Mediating Intelligentsia and the German New Right in Dresden

By Julian Göpffarth

While Tellkamp and Grünbein are well-known figures in the German public sphere, and their debate received a lot of attention in the German mediascape, little attention is paid to less prominent, more local intellectuals. This is probably due to the tendency to associate the social concept of the “public intellectual” with a certain degree of grandeur or prestige, and a national or even global audience.

Protecting the Natural Environment? A Look at the Radical Right

By Bernhard Forchtner

When contemplating radical-right politics, whether past or present, few think about the fight against environmental degradation. Yet to consider radical-right perspectives on environmental issues and the natural environment more generally does provide an important insight into these actors’ ideas and practices.

October 2018

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science), and Thomas Nolden (Comparative Literature)

Hearing Hate: White Power Music

By Rob May 

The radical right is currently flourishing across the globe. Positioned at the extreme end of this ideological spectrum are Hitler worshipping neo-Nazis. Back in the 1980s, these white supremacists created their own genre of music – White Power – which has since become an essential ingredient of neo-Nazi skinhead propaganda.

Radicalism and Violence in Europe

By Cynthia Miller-Idriss, Nicole Shea, and Fabian Virchow

In this special issue, artists and authors take up these issues in a series of feature essays and works, short opinion pieces, and research reports, examining questions of radicalism and violence, prevention and intervention, and radicalization and de-radicalization across Europe and other parts of the world. The authors examine cases from Germany, France, Hungary, the U.K. and beyond, looking at social media, school-based interventions, the use of history by far groups, the role of public intellectuals, and more.

Terroir, Wine Culture, and Globalization: What Does Terroir do to Wine?

By Marion Demossier

Throughout the last decade, the global world of wine has seen a radical transformation, defined by the emergence of the concept of terroir as a space for renegotiation of past, present, and future ways of producing, selling, and consuming wine. But what is terroir? And why is it attracting so much interest from academics, producers, experts, and wine consumers?

Baltic Agriculture: The Political Economy of Extremes

By Anu Mai Kõll

Historically, the fate of the Baltic realm has been difficult. It served as a kind of Middle East of the North; inhabited by small ethnic groups with larger neighbors, which tended to play out rivalries fighting about their territory. German feudal lords, knights and barons, were a heritage from the crusades in Latvian- and Estonian-speaking areas in the thirteenth century.

“Let Them Eat Cake:” European Austerity, Food Insecurity, and Food Fraud

By Louise Manning

This article focuses on Europe and the interaction between food price spikes, economic downturn and political austerity, and the risk of reported food fraud. It is important to firstly consider the impact of the 2007-2008 financial crash on household food security and the role of food insecurity as a driver towards political instability.

Looking Backward, Moving Forward: Articulating a “Yes, BUT…!” Response to Lifestyle Veganism

By Richard White

One way to approach this question involves identifying and teasing apart two rather crude-but-important approaches of veganism. One is rooted in the “original” definition for veganism, which emerged in the UK in the 1940s. I will refer to this as “activist” veganism, one which inspires a more radical vision for veganism, encouraging greater critical reflection, awareness, and commitment to social justice issues than “the other” type of veganism, namely “lifestyle,” or “corporate” veganism

The Moral Economies of Agricultural Production and the Role of Property Relations

By Angela Cacciarru

How do diverse property systems work in order to ensure access to land and the management of local resource? What role do moral economies play beyond property? Von Benda-Beckmann and Wiber find these questions intriguing, and argue that property regimes cannot be expressed by any one-dimensional political, economic, or legal model: they are multi-dimensional and multi-functional.

From Disturbing to Disrupting? Cultured Meat and Early 21st Century Veganism

By Erik Jönsson

As a number of scholars have noted, cultured (or “in vitro,” or “clean”) meat is, today, a confusing technology, shot through with ontological ambiguity. What cultured meat eventually could become, and what cultured meat is today, are both uncertain. Moreover, in making sense of cultured meat in relation to (particular forms of) contemporary veganism, cultural and technological processes visibly entangle.

Food Citizenship? Collective Food Procurement in European Cities

By Cristina Grasseni

Collective food procurement defines the production, distribution, and consumption of food with a participatory dimension: for example community gardens, but also new entrepreneurship based on urban agriculture, as well as broader projects governing food markets or allotments at municipal level.

A Conversation About Urban Agriculture

By Christine Aubry and Baptiste Grard

Through this conversation, we can see that urban agriculture is an open door to delve into many issues around the functioning and development of urban environment: food provisioning, habitat fragmentation, soil waterproofing, waste recycling, well-being, social linkages, etc.

September 2018

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Daniela Irrera (International Relations), Samantha Lomb (History), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), and Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science).

Food, Food Systems, and Agriculture

By Hélène B. Ducros

The articles and interviews included here clearly convey that food stands as an entry point into a wide range of contemporary and historical debates that touch all humans. What is more, they also indicate that food operates as a spatial and temporal link across a complex web of interconnected social, cultural, political, economic, environmental, demographic, nutritional, and physiological topics

Superfood or Dangerous Drug? Coffee, Tea, and Chocolate in the Late 17th Century

By Ken Albala

We are all too familiar today with the wildly exaggerated health claims made for so-called super foods. Often based loosely on clinical research, the underlying motivation for these claims is, of course, selling new products. Foods are likewise demonized with the same motives, here too pushing a new line and maximizing profit underlies the latest fad diets that ban whole classes of food.

Famine and Dearth in Medieval England

By Phillipp Schofield

While we have a general sense of famine events in this period and some inroads into exploring the extent and impact of famine and dearth, there is also a great deal we do not know about famine in the middle ages. In fact, our ignorance in regards to famine reflects a more general gap in our understanding of medieval society.

Anxiety in Our Times

By Jordi Torrent

Many studies and experts are pointing that the main reason of the increase of anxiety in our society (particularly in youth, but not only) are the uses we are making of contemporary media, in particular of social media.

Digital Strangers at Our Door: Moral Panic and the Refugee Crisis

By Sandra Ponzanesi

The status of Europe, which is supposed to welcome so-called “legitimate” refugees, is itself so very precarious at the moment; instead of identification with the needy, this has led to antagonism, ambivalence and fear, often erupting into pure xenophobia, expertly manipulated by right-wing demagogues and anti-immigration parties

Toward a Strengths-Based Approach to Mitigating our Anxiety Culture

By Beatrice L. Bridglall

It appears that our ability to moderate anxiety over accelerations in climate change, may hinge on what we believe and how we perceive this issue. Cognitive scientists suggest the value of reframing our mental maps in efforts to process our fears and dilemmas more constructively and positively.

Do Our Concepts of Bilingual Education Match the Anxieties of Migrants?

By Bàrbara Roviró and Patricia Martínez-Álvarez

Anxieties related to the parenting experience for migrant families are complicated by multiple factors, some of which are perceived as being life-threatening, and thus, at times, prioritized over any others (e.g., making a living, finding a home, having someone to care for their children, paying their bills, or avoiding police prosecution, among others).

Migration, Europe, and Staged Affect-Scenarios

By Paul Mecheril and Monica van der Haagen-Wulff

Lacan’s ideas establish the theoretical framework in which subjectivization and identity formation can be understood, not merely in the solipsistic process of the self, but rather as a constant “mirror dynamic.”

Robotics and Emotion

By Stephan Habscheid, Christine Hrncal, Jens Lüssem, Rainer Wieching, Felix Carros, and Volker Wulf

One of the commonplaces in the debate on technological innovation is that interpretations and expectations, emotions and assessments with which people encounter new technologies, differ considerably in cultural terms. In the public debate in Germany, for example, it is often claimed that robots in Japan are generally already anchored much more widely and consensus-based in society, and that instead of the fears, anxiety, and skepticism towards robotic technology, which are characteristic for Germany, trust in and gratitude towards technology prevail in Japan.

Anxiety Culture

By Nicole Shea and Emmanuel Kattan

The challenges of climate change, pandemics, mental illness, rapid technological change and its impact on work and individual freedom, migration and its social and political consequences are not always best understood under the prism of “crisis.” Rather, they seep into our collective consciousness, building on an increased sense of insecurity and powerlessness and shaping our relationships with others and the world.

Anxiety Culture: The New Global State of Human Affairs?

By Michael I. Schapira, Ulrich Hoinkes, and John P. Allegrante

There are many consequences of living in this state of anxiety on an individual or collective level. Invoking crisis or danger tends to speed up our thinking and lend a sense of urgency to our actions, but might this come at the expense of a deeper understanding of the changing face of our societies?

July 2018

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Daniela Irrera (International Relations), Samantha Lomb (History), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), Nick Ostrum (History), and Thomas Nolden (Literature).

Central Asia in the Age of Connectivity

By Alberto Turkstra

At a time when other regions and geopolitical hotspots are dominating the political and media headlines, Central Asia has been quietly taking advantage of the extraordinary opportunities deriving from the region’s increasingly central role in the numerous connectivity initiatives and corridors that are traversing Eurasia, of which China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) is a primary example.

16+1: The EU’s Concerns of a Chinese ‘Trojan Horse’

By Eamonn Butler 

In July 2018, Bulgaria, fresh off the back of its EU Presidency, will host the seventh annual summit for “Cooperation between China and Central and Eastern European Countries.” More commonly known 16+1 Initiative, it is a diplomatic platform coordinated by China, to support institutional coordination of relations between China and sixteen countries from the Central and East European (CEE) region.

The EU and China: Prospects of Cooperation on Climate and Energy

By Alexandra-Maria Bocse

The EU also cooperates with China towards the implementation of the Paris Agreement in the framework of initiatives such the Clean Energy Ministerial, a global forum promoting policies and sharing best practices in order to accelerate the transition to clean energy.

Roads, Belts, and Connectivities: Chinese Silk Road Projects in New Perspective

By Madeleine Herren

Chinese news is presenting the new silk road project with a strong reference to a deep historical past, imaging the silk road as a bustling trading route established centuries ago. The narrative usually does not mention the very fact that the concept of a silk road in the sense of a coherent trading route only surfaced as recently as 1877.

The Politics of Studying Europe in China

By Ralph Weber and Silvana Tarlea

It is difficult to disregard the importance of the relationship between Europe and China. The European Union (EU) is China’s biggest trading partner and China is the EU’s second-biggest trading partner after the United States. In order to enhance and consolidate relations with China, the EU has provided considerable research funding to Chinese universities over the years.

June 2018

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Samantha Lomb (History), and Louie Dean Valencia-García (History).

Europe-China Relations

By Eamonn Butler and Nicole Shea

It has been more than 40 years since the first formal, diplomatic relations between China and the European Union (EU) were established. In the subsequent years, relations between these two global economic powerhouses have significantly developed, with both the EU and China publishing and implementing a number of communiqués intended to build and strengthen partnership.

Public Spaces, Urban Heritage, and Politics

By Cor Wagenaar

Only in the late eighteenth century, curing patients was identified as the primary function of hospitals, and the provision of clean air as the best tool to do so. This view was propagated by medical doctors and produced buildings in which medicine, paradoxically, only played a marginal role.

Linked by Research: Berlin and St. Petersburg

By Eszter Gantner

We consider urban interventions to be practices in which the most diverse participants make their socio-political positions and genuine private interests clear and visible and exert their influence on the public space.

Commoning in Action: Walking in St. Petersburg, Urban Gardening in Istanbul

By Ayse Erek

Debates on the shrinking public space in Istanbul are not new. Since the last two decades, they have been crystalized in relation to the topics such as the regeneration of old neighborhoods, protecting heritage, the right for the waterfronts and green spaces, as well as the public but unused spaces, revived with old or new ways of usages.

May 2018

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Samantha Lomb (History), and Louie Dean Valencia-García (History).

Contemporary Urban Research in the European City

By Nicole Shea and Eszter Gantner

By now, urban public spaces have become strongly contested resources in present European cities, where multiple agents are claiming the right to these spaces. Reacting to this development, this special issue concentrates on European cities, focusing on their public spaces, their histories and their rich heritages.

Soviet Communists on the Factory Floor: 1926–1941

By Yiannis Kokosalakis

The question thus remained; what did Lenin’s vanguard actually do? One of the most influential social historians of the Stalin period described party activism as a paradox, pointing out that the many thousands of communist rank-and-filers were representatives of political authority, but their activities brought them to conflict with functionaries of the state everywhere.

April 2018

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Samantha Lomb (History), Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), and Daniela Irrera (International Relations).

Katrine Ogaard Jensen; Kayla Maiuri; Nordic Voices

New Nordic Voices

By Katrine Øgaard Jensen and Kayla Maiuri

A selection of emerging writers from Nordic countries—Iceland, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, and the Faroe Islands.

“Eurafrica” is Dead: In Fact, It Never Existed

By Veit Bachmann

The term “Eurafrica” invokes a global panregion that has long and pervasively been a fantasy of imperialistic geopolitics, yet that has never existed. First, the spatial construction of panregions is in itself problematic as it describes a “large functional area linking core states to resource peripheries and cutting across latitudinal distributed environmental zones” and is thus inherently exploitative and imperial. Second, it is superficial, incomplete, and possibly essentializing as it suggests a homogeneity that has never existed.

A Forgotten Colony: Equatorial Guinea and Spain

By Adriana Chira

In our geographic imaginaries, Spanish colonialism tends to be mapped onto South America. But the last Spanish colony to claim independence from Spain in 1968 was a territory in West Africa—Equatorial Guinea

Layering Over the Wounds of Algeria in Contemporary Pied-Noir Art

By Amy L. Hubbell 

France’s former French citizens of Algeria, the Pieds-Noirs, include one of Europe’s largest diaspora communities in the twentieth century. This diverse group of people settled in Algeria during the colonial years, and after one-hundred and thirty years of French colonial rule, Algeria fought for and won its independence in 1962. The seven-year war was traumatic for both the Algerians and the French living in the colony, and nearly one million people crossed the Mediterranean during and after the war to make a new home in France.

Behind the Humanitarian Crisis in the Mediterranean: Five Years After Lampedusa, Political Incoherence and Dysfunction Continues to Kill

By Anna Arnone and David O’Kane

Certain historical incidents can crystallize and condense the reality of an entire era. The mass drowning of at least 500 migrants, mostly Eritrean, near the island of Lampedusa on the third of October 2013, was one such incident. It was part of a wider set of political logics that characterize this era, logics that include those described by Barbara Pinelli in her ethnography of the conditions endured by asylum seekers in the reception centers of the Italian state.

Scrambling for Africa, Again: Germans in Kenya

By Nina Berman

Across the world, the effects of neoliberal capitalism and anthropocentric excesses act as stressors on people and their natural habitat. On the sub-Saharan African continent, neoliberal economic development, in conjunction with economic and political programs of authoritarian postcolonial rulers, have increased the economic and social precarity of the urban and rural poor.

A Brief History of Dutch in Africa

By Michael Meeuwis

Dutch has been present in South Africa since the establishment in 1652 of the first permanent Dutch settlement around what is now Cape Town. In the decades and centuries that followed, the Dutch spoken there, detached from its ancestor in Europe, underwent internal developments as well as influences from other languages.

March 2018

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), Mihai Sebe (Political Science), and Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science).

 

Beyond Eurafrica: Encounters in a Globalized World

By Hélène B. Ducros

With this special feature, EuropeNow confirms the web of connectivity that exists between nations of Europe and nations of Africa, as not only rooted in geopolitics and global economic flows, but also increasingly in global cultural flows, which support the enduring linkages and reciprocal influences between the two continents and shape the ways in which both Africans and Europeans apprehend the local and the global.

Globalization Under Fire

By Peter Debaere

Under the banner of “Make America Great Again,” Trump took every opportunity to call for more protectionism and to blame “bad trade deals” for the predicament of the United States.

Dark: Energy Politics in an Age of Latency

By Samantha Fox

Dark, with its drama centered on the consequences of nuclear energy production—social and economic consequences, in addition to those more speculative and supernatural—illustrates the degree to which changing energy politics serve as the backdrop to everyday life in Germany. One hopes that the show can export Germany’s attention to energy politics to an international audience.

The Rise of Nativism in Europe

By Jan Willem Duyvendak and Josip Kesic 

Wilders has not only dominated the public sphere in the Netherlands for more than fifteen years, but has also become a prominent voice in transnational anti-Islam circles.

The European Union, Spain, and the Catalan Question: An Affair Beyond the Spanish Border?

By Juan Andrés García Martín

Since the economic crisis began, Catalan nationalism has abandoned its traditional cooperation with the central government. This radicalization happened under the argument of lack of economic assistance, the impossibility of recognizing of its particularities, and political repression, leading towards a unilateral policy. Moreover, Catalan nationalism identified not only a foreign enemy — Spain — but domestic enemies — those who support unity with Spain.

Poland, a “Normal” European Country

By Agnieszka Pasieka

Among numerous questions that have been posed after recent electoral successes of conservative, right-wing, populist parties at least one seems to be repeated ad nauseam: “Who voted for them?” Whether this question is asked on the occasion of a dinner among friends, an academic conference, or a business meeting, it tends to provoke a somewhat comforting reaction: those who committed “such terrible electoral mistakes” were misled, driven by emotions (usually “anger” and “fear”), and deluded by hopes of economic gains.

Between Nativism and Indigeneity in the Kabyle Diaspora of France

By Jonathan Harris

Nativism and nationalist populism, despite Macron’s 2017 victory over the Front National, are a significant part of contemporary French politics. Popular concerns about the weakening power of the nation-state to control the economic and demographic effects of globalization contribute to xenophobic, and particularly Islamophobic, attitudes in broader contemporary French state and society, predominantly directed at France’s large Maghrebi postcolonial diaspora.

Reflections on the Czech Election

By Jan Čulík

Zeman’s victory is a sign of the emergence of politics of parasitism as a mainstream political strategy within Central Europe in general, and the Czech Republic in particular. Both Miloš Zeman and most Czech politicians have realized that in order to gain substantial political support amongst voters, they no longer need to develop strategies for the solution of many of the existing, often intractable, social problems. The only thing they need to do in order to gain influence and money is to peddle fear.

The Essence of our Era: Yukio Mishima, Steve Bannon, and the Alt-Right

By Christopher Impiglia 

What the alt-right still lacks is a leader that can not only champion many of its ideals and bring them to the forefront of the political debate, but outright embraces it in return; despite flattering calls of “Heil Trump,” at Charlottesville, the president has increasingly distanced himself from the alt-right, most recently by ousting their mouthpiece—Bannon—from the White House, although his policies and consistent, racist comments continue to reveal clear alt-right sympathies.

The Power of Narrative: An Interview with Mikkel Rosengaard

Interviewed by Morten Høi Jensen

In democratic nations there is usually a multitude of narratives about people in power, but in these one-man dictatorships there’s just one, and its usually very warped and far-fetched. So I was very interested in the idea of Ceaușescu’s narrative in Romania, and of how one’s own narrative about one’s life clashes with that larger, overpowering official narrative. And then, of course, there’s the fact that, from a storytelling perspective, in a world in which these very rigid rules are imposed on you there’s much more at stake.

February 2018

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science), Samantha Lomb (History), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), and Hélène Ducros (Geography).

Nationalism, Nativism, and the Revolt Against Globalization

By Manuela AchillesKyrill Kunakhovich, and Nicole Shea

This special issue examines the resurgence of far-right groups, considering how recent events in Charlottesville can illuminate radical movements in Europe. It focuses on three key elements: nationalism, nativism, and the revolt against globalization. Nationalism was the word most associated with the Charlottesville rally, whose participants often called themselves “white nationalists.” By this, they meant that a racialized national identity should be the condition for political belonging.

December 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Samantha Lomb (History), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), Daniela Irrera (International Relations), and Hélène Ducros (Geography).

Diversity, Security, Mobility: Challenges for Eastern Europe

By Nicole Shea and Peter Haslinger

In this special anniversary edition of EuropeNow, curators Peter Haslinger and Nicole Shea highlight the importance in research and culture of smaller central and eastern European regions. The research presented here assesses the concepts, paradigms, and methods for the re-evaluation of multi-ethnicity, diversity, and mobility in a globalized and “post-factual” era, and seeks to identify factors and agencies that help to explain the current trends towards the obsession with security agendas.

Russia’s ‘Myth’ of Equality in a Securitized Context

By Federica Prina

Russia is an exceptionally vast and heterogeneous country with high levels of ethnic, linguistic, and religious diversity, and a complex federal structure. The Russian empire already saw an intermingling of peoples, encompassing Slavic, Scandinavian, and Asiatic groups, with various forms of hybridization, multilingualism, and cultural cross-fertilization.

Securitizing the Unknown Borderlands: Czechoslovak Subcarpathian Rus and Its Minorities

By Sebastian Paul

The Subcarpathian Rus is still a region for specialists. For hundreds of years, together with Slovakia, the territory of later Subcarpathian Rus embodied the northeastern part of the Kingdom of Hungary. Until 1918, it was the neighboring region to Habsburg Galicia, and in the Interwar Period, it formed Czechoslovakia’s eastern borderland to the reestablished Polish state.

Why Europe Needs Political Economy

By Gregory W. Fuller

Fuller considers how European policymakers have relied too much on “mainstream” economic analysis in the design and re-design of eurozone governance structures.

The City is in Ruins

By Salvatore Settis

“The city is in ruins.” In European cultural memory, these simple words have, sometimes, a literal sense (either narrative or descriptive)—when we talk about wars, insurrections, and natural disasters, for instance. More often, they have a strong metaphorical relevance according two complementary directions.

The Accidental Keynesian: How Refugee Spending in Sweden Challenged Austerity, Put the Local Fiscal Houses In Order and Proved Beneficial to All

By Peo Hansen

“Despite Sweden’s sizeable refugee reception, its economy is doing exceptionally well.” This line has been repeated on countless occasions over the past year or so. By the government, experts, and pundits — from right to left. As the president of the Swedish Trade Union Confederation put it a little while ago: “Despite an unstable world and a refugee emergency, Sweden’s economy is performing very well.” Despite?

November 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Katrine Øgaard Jensen (Literature), Samantha Lomb (History), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), Daniela Irrera (International Relations), and Hélène Ducros (Geography).

Political Economy on TARGET

By Waltraud Schelkle

Albeit an arcane institution, TARGET, the cross-border payments system of the euro area, is a good example for how economics and political economy can be combined to advance our understanding of European integration.

The Crises of European Integration

By Erik Jones, Regine Paul, and Nicole Shea

The inescapable politics of knowledge production about and for a Europe in crisis demands scholarly transparency. In this issue, we consider the value and limits of their disciplinary perspectives in explaining the recent crises of European Integration. We nail our colors to the mast by arguing that a political economy approach is valuable – and ought to be cherished – for seeing more than just economics vs. politics at play in explaining crisis and navigating Europe’s future.

What Prospects for Change to Achieve a Sustainable EU Migration Policy?

By Elif Çetin

Europe is facing the largest humanitarian disaster since the end of World War II. Even though the European governments, in an attempt to address public feelings of insecurity about immigration, seek to project themselves as able to manage international migration effectively, the objectives and outcomes of their immigration and border control policies do not always overlap.

Narratives of Belonging: Polish Immigrants in the UK After Brexit

By Agnieszka Kulesa

Despite fears related to the increase in hate crime numbers following the EU referendum, and the uncertainty around their future residency status, immigrants from Poland will not abandon their established lives in the UK as willingly as the Brexit supporters would wish to see.

October 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science), and Lillian Klein (Literature).

Governing the Migration Crisis

By Jennifer Elrick, Oliver Schmidtke, and Nicole Shea

We have seen two opposing trends across Europe: On the one hand, civil society has demonstrated a great degree of compassion with the plight of refugees, organizing local welcome committees and, in the Canadian case, even putting pressure on the government to accept more refugees from Syria as a fundamental humanitarian commitment of the country. On the other hand, the populist Right has exploited the influx of so many refugees for their political mobilization.

Lviv in Wartime

By John Lindner

I see only the two small feet of a child, who had just been previously feigning sleep, walk across the stage below a hovering curtain. They are met at the wings by a pair of adult shoes when the lights turn on for intermission.

A Transnational Place-based Label for the “Glocal Village”

By Hélène B. Ducros

By the early 1980s, some rural mayors in France came to the realization that their villages were dying. In spite of a strong attachment to the rural in the French collective imaginary, many factors had contributed to rural decline and exodus since the early twentieth century.

Europe and Island Tourism

By Godfrey Baldacchino

In the wake of the Greek “financial crisis,” some observers were surprised to note that the Greek islands, with their less-developed economic fabric, weathered the storm much better than their urban counterparts.

Ten Years After Romania’s Entry into the EU

By Aura Socol

When Romania joined the EU it implicitly assumed responsibility for adopting the euro. After ten years, contrary to what was expected, East European states including Romania meet the nominal criteria for being accepted in the Eurozone while states from the Eurozone itself do not.

September 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography) and Julian Garritzmann (Political Science).

U.S.-E.U. Relations in the Face of Brexit and Trump: An Interview with Joseph Grieco

Interviewed by Daniela Irrera

Realism is certainly helpful in making sense of the recent return of great-power tensions. However, many important aspects of world politics today require close attention to domestic institutions and political processes—I’m thinking of the revolt against globalization and the rise of populism in Britain, the USA, France, Italy, and the Netherlands.

Tourism: People, Places & Mobilities

By Hélène B. Ducros and Katrine Øgaard Jensen

In Europe, from the time of religious pilgrimages or journeys to spa towns for thermal treatments, all sorts of people have undertaken recreational travel since at least the Middle-Ages, even if motivations differed. But, it is with the industrial revolution that tourism took on a new face with the practice of the tour. Later, the emergence of paid leave in many places gave the impetus for the first mass tourists.

Morten Høi Jensen

Saul Bellow and the Moronic Inferno

By Morten Høi Jensen

One of the central conflicts of Bellow’s novels is the apparent incommensurability of Old World thinking with the demonic pace of American society. The country’s big cities become a sort of battleground of Big Ideas. Bellow once wrote movingly of his discovery of the classics of European literature and philosophy as a young man darting about the streets of Depression-era Chicago.

Homonegativity in Eastern Europe

By Catherine Bolzendahl and Ksenia Gracheva

Stagnating and declining of tolerance toward homosexuality in Eastern Europe should be alarming to anyone taking note of changes in Europe. It represents not only disparate perspectives on sexuality and freedom of personal identity, but also signifies a cultural and political rift between Western and Eastern Europe that may be deepening. Growing intolerance could be a symptom of a dangerous divide between East and West, rooted in political disenchantment and subsequent mutual rejection.

The European Refugee Crisis and the Myth of the Immigrant Rapist

By Caitlin Carroll

In the “myth of the immigrant rapist,” white women’s bodies are seen as in need of protection by a paternalist state from the sexual violence of brown men. In the case of Europe’s refugee crisis, this protection took the form of closing borders and harshening immigration policies, including curtailing family reunification for refugees.

“A Beautiful Night with Marine:” Marine Le Pen and Gender-Hegemonic Charisma

By Dorit Geva

Why would FN members link such narratives of Marine Le Pen’s feminine and masculine virtues alongside their virulent criticism of the European Union, Muslim immigrants, and political elites? How is a woman who is viewed as the beloved political daughter, the quintessential femme moderne, and at the same time as the new Charles de Gaulle, treated as the most potent cure to France’s political and economic woes? Why, in sum, do populist supporters emphasize such gendered virtues in their everyday discourses around their beloved leader?

The Alt-Right

Produced by Daniel Goulden

In this episode of the EuropeNow podcast we explore the murky world of the alt-right, the online movement dedicated to opposing multiculturalism and globalization. We’ll take a look at how the alt-right formed, the factors that led to their rapid rise, and how they advance their motives. Welcome to the EuropeNow Podcast.

Recognizing the Revolution: Thoughts on Genetic Distractions to Prenatal Care

By Shelley Grant

It is entirely possible that Europe, although in the midst of many grand debates on the acceptability of social sexual performances, is also unwittingly leading a sexual revolution on the microscopic level. The profundity of integrating the benefits of technology advances into pregnancy care may seem compelling. Yet, the incrementalization of pre-birth care may cause socially disorienting, disagreeable, and demanding effects.

 

The Gender of Power

By Michael Stambolis-Ruhstorfer, Kayla Maiuri, and Gill Allwood

Given the severity of challenges facing Europe, from Brexit and the Trump administration’s thinly veiled hostility to the EU and NATO, to the on-going influx of refugees and the rise of populism, writing about gender and sexuality might seem quaint, even indulgent to some people. They would be mistaken. Any thorough examination of the political, social, and economic situation of Europe in the early twenty-first century takes gender and sexuality seriously.

July 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science), and Muireann O’Dwyer (Political Science).

From Interinstitutional Competition to Interinstitutional Collaboration

By Stéphane Charitos, Christopher Kaiser, and Nelleke Van Deusen-Scholl

In response to rapidly changing conditions in higher education, an increasing number of institutions of colleges and universities are exploring the potential for collaborative models of course and program sharing to help them meet their academic goals.

Collaboration in Refugee Education: Field Notes from Bard College Berlin

By Kerry Bystrom with Marion Detjen

The following “field notes” give a glimpse into the College’s engagement in education and forced migration since 2015, when our PIE-SC plans crystallized, by profiling one pilot project created with the current and future cohorts of students with a forced migration background in mind.

Sustainability & Innovation

By Maria Höhn and Nicole Shea

In this challenging time of governmental retrenchment—with its accompanying cuts to the Arts and Humanities—many foundations have been stepping up and pivoting their missions to a defense of democratic values and shared cultural heritages. At the same time, institutions of higher learning, think tanks, artists, policy makers, and NGOs have been reimagining their mission and innovating new models of collaboration not only among like-minded institutions, but across disciplines and national boundaries.

June 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science), Hélène Ducros (Geography), Daniela Irrera (International Relations), and Özden Ocak (Sociology).

Encircling the Now by Felix Meyer-Christian

By Felix Meyer-Christian

Within the context of the world-wide refuge crisis, as well as the rising populism in the U.S. and Europe, one can clearly observe a distinct re-politicization of artists and their works, and the question of how to deal with the current state of uncertainty and urgency has been strongly reinforced in artistic discourse.

Facing the Anthropocene

By Katrine Øgaard Jensen and Hélène B. Ducros

Our global dependence on fossil fuels, nuclear power, intense resource extraction economies, genetic manipulations, air, soil, and water contamination, and byproducts of modernity such as waste material like plastics and other synthetic polymers have caused great disturbances in the Earth ecosystems on which many species depend, including the human species.

May 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Kelly McKowen (Anthropology), and Mihai Sebe (Political Science).

Thomas Mann in America

By Morten Høi Jensen

Wary of the youthful temptations of novelty, Mann argued eloquently for a political-spiritual renaissance, a rekindling of faith in the long project of democracy. He reminded his audience that it was “your American statesmen and poets such as Lincoln and Whitman who proclaimed to the world democratic thought and feeling, and the democratic way of life, in imperishable words.”

The European Union at 60: The Future Will be Brighter Than Many Expect

By Roland Benedikter and Ireneusz Pawel Karolewski

The European Union is marking the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, which was signed on 25 March 1957. But is there a bleak future for the integration process? Roland Benedikter and Ireneusz Pawel Karolewski argue that the EU is in a significantly healthier position than it appears, and that far from grinding to a halt, European integration will continue to be relevant in the coming decades.

Can We Talk? Neuroscientists and Humanists on Memory

By Angelika Bammer

The strength and potential of memory research arguably lies in its interdisciplinary scope: the fact that it brings people from across the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences together to identify problems and explore solutions. But this cross-disciplinary collaboration is often easier said than done.

World War I and Historical Memory

By Carl Strikwerda

World War I created a watershed in world history. It punctured belief in progress and radically shifted art, theology, psychology, and literature.

April 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography) and Louie Dean Valencia-García (History).

March 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), Samantha Lomb (History), Mihai Sebe (Political Science), and Daniela Irrera (International Relations).

Forced Migration, Cultural Identity, and Trauma

By Nicole Shea and Turhan Canli

In political analysis, scientific inquiry, literature, poetry, language, and the arts, we examine the loss of culture and identity and the effects of trauma on the human mind, as well as the healing power of artistic expression.

President Donald Trump EuropeNow

Trump Against Europe

By Morten Høi Jensen

It would take many rigorous and carefully administered lessons in world history to cover the vast and chilling tundra of President Trump’s ignorance. European history might not be a bad place to start, however, especially if you believe, as President Trump does, that the European Union was created in order to “beat the United States when it comes to trade,” or that it is merely “a vehicle for Germany.”

President Donald Trump EuropeNow

Confronting the Terrorist/Refugee Narrative

By James Fitzgerald

This article critically interrogates the “terrorist/refugee” narrative that has become a mainstay of increasingly right-wing political and (social) media discourse. It contextualizes the conflation of “refugees” with “terrorists” by reference to logics of contemporary counterterrorism practices, which tend to securitize entire populations based on the threat that they might produce.

Untranslated Fire: Francophone Responses to the Charlie Hebdo Attacks

By Arturo Desimone

The November 13, 2015 attack summoned unlikely mourners from the political elite. A towering human mausoleum rose above the French ground-zero, propped with flags of causes that were alien and alienating to the leftist ideology of the Hebdo family, whose hard-earned infamy had preceded them for decades, only to be trivialized into consensus and tricolor shrouds.

The History of Migration in Europe

Produced by Daniel Goulden

In this episode of the Europe Now Podcast, we take a look at the refugee crisis in Europe from a historical perspective. We’ll travel to the last ice age, the Roman Empire, and America during WWI to discuss other refugee crises and look at their effects.

February 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Hélène Ducros (Geography), Ozden Ocak (Sociology), Mihai Sebe (Political Science), and Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science).

Praise the Mutilated World

By Morten Høi Jensen

The experience of the people of Lvov is an important rejoinder to the resurgent ethnic nationalism now tightening its grip on Europe—with its nostalgia for some illusory cultural and ethnic homogeneity, for a lost golden age that never existed and to which it would not be desirable to return if it did.

Yet Another Greco-German Imbalance

Reviewed by Angelos-Stylianos Chryssogelo

The first half is a Keynesian analysis of the flaws of the Eurozone architecture; the second half is a condensed political program of how a country could negotiate and implement an exit from the euro.

Missing Chances for Change

Reviewed by Shawn Donnelly

Instead of focusing on stable prices as the benchmark of a working monetary union, Flassbeck and Lapavitsas argue for coordination of unit labour costs instead, following observations of how economic growth in Europe closely follows wage growth.

Calling to Arms But Leaving Ammunition Behind

Reviewed by Michele Chang

Written in an accessible style, this hybrid treatment risks not engaging extensively enough with economic theory (there are not a lot of references for the various economic arguments they mention, for example) to convince those who are not already sympathetic to their cause.

Borgen and the Double Bind: The Haunted Princesses of the Danish Castle

By Julia Khrebtan-Hörhager

The series became a hit in many European countries and later in the USA. John Powers, a reporter from the US National Public Radio claims that Borgen is Denmark’s West Wing (but even better). Borgen harvested an impressive amount of international awards in various categories—ranging from Best Drama Series and specifically Best European Drama TV Series to the Outstanding Actress in the Drama Series by Sidse Babett Knudsen (better known to the audience as Birgitte Nyborg).

Brexit EuropeNow

Past Imperfect: The Brexit Gamble

By Jacob Høi Jensen

In their desperate attempt to promote a vision of a United Kingdom, which is based on a glorified and nostalgic interpretation of the past, Brexiteers have unleashed a process that risks upending the legal, economic, and political foundations of the modern UK. Furthermore, they have yet to offer a coherent and realistic vision of what will replace it.

January 2017

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Julian Garritzmann (Political Science), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), and Hélène Ducros (Geography).

Sunlight and Arrows: Five Invocations for the Silent Muse

By Dan Beachy-Quick

In the summer of 2012, James Eagan Holmes walked from the midnight alley through the propped open door of the movie theater into which he would throw gas canisters and, wearing a black assault vest, his hair dyed an acid orange, he opened fire.

Georg Brandes, Good European

By Morten Høi Jensen

From his beginnings as a swashbuckling literary provocateur in 1870s Copenhagen, whose conservative provincialism he outraged with his liberalism, cosmopolitanism, and Jewishness, Brandes’s reputation swelled over several decades of relentless literary and political activism in the service of liberal and progressive ideals.

The Past Makes Its Appearance Once Again

By Christopher Impiglia

Mussolini’s skewed image of the past and his romanticizing of Imperial Rome, without considering its flaws and understanding the reasons for its downfall, ultimately helped lead to his downfall.

December 2016

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science), Hélène Ducros (Geography), and Daniela Irrera (International Relations).

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Neglecting Health Inequalities in Germany

By Nadine Reibling

Unlike other rich countries in Europe, such as the United Kingdom, Denmark, or the Netherlands, Germany has no comprehensive political strategy or program that specifically aims to reduce such inequalities. Political attempts to address health inequalities are limited to small health promotion initiatives targeted at socially disadvantaged groups.

Secularism and Religion: The Attempted Coup in Turkey

By Tayfun Kasapoglu

The power struggle between secularists and “Islamists” has marked the history of Turkish politics. In this struggle, the Turkish military has acted as the guardian of the state, staging coups and banning certain political parties and figures in order to protect the secular system of the country (Jung 2008).

Political Landscape in Turkey: Suspicion Against the Hizmet Movement

By Mette Fallesen

It is almost impossible to speak of Turkish politics without to some degree addressing the conspiracy theories regarding the inner workings of the state. By calling them conspiracy theories, I intend to draw attention to how they are formed and in what way they reflect on how the state is imagined.

The Politics of Health Equity in Europe

By Courtney McNamara and Jennifer J. Carroll

The essays presented in this special feature address the growing public and political concern over increasing levels of social stratification and reveal the political relevance of health inequalities across Europe. Specifically, we asked health inequality experts to reflect on some of the biggest challenges surrounding health inequalities in different European countries.

November 2016

By the EuropeNow Editorial Committee

Here are this month’s editor’s picks from Research Editorial Committee members Malcolm Campbell-Verduyn (Political Science), Louie Dean Valencia-García (History), and Hélène Ducros (Geography).

What is Europe?

Produced by Daniel Goulden

Welcome to the EuropeNow Podcast. In this inaugural episode we try to answer the seemingly simple question: What is Europe? We’ll take a look at the geographic, historical, and political definitions of Europe and see if any of them are satisfactory. We’ll also take a look at the potential for the dream of a unified Europe and the threats to that dream.