Browsing Category

Campus

1092

Making Meaning in a Global Art Market: Presentations of European Artworks by Chinese and Arab “Supercollectors”

By Spencer Kaplan

I argue that these supercollectors do far more than simply move European art out of Europe. Central to their practices is the transformation of the very experience of these cultural objects. Through their museum exhibitions and accompanying catalogs, press releases, interviews, and panel discussions, the supercollectors imbue their European acquisitions with non-European narratives of economic power, national identity, and heritage.

Assessing the Impact of Air Pollution on Students’ Interest in Migration to the European Union: A Study on Students at the University of Macau

By Evelin Rizzo

Air pollution has emerged as the world’s fourth-leading fatal risk to people’s health, causing one in ten deaths in 2013. Each year, more than 5.5 million people around the world die prematurely from illnesses caused by breathing polluted air. A study conducted in 2016 by the World Bank and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington reports that “breathing polluted air increases the risk of debilitating and deadly diseases such as lung cancer, stroke, heart disease, and chronic bronchitis.

Syllabus: Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative

By Sandra Carletti

Food and life experiences are inextricably linked. In this course, we will examine the ways in which literature uses food to represent and understand the human experience  We will focus on the various symbolic functions of food associated with the images of cooking, eating, drinking, and feasting presented in these literary works.

Syllabus: Sociology of Food

By Erica Morrell

In this course, we will learn about and apply core sociological perspectives to analyze dynamics of local, regional, national, and global agri-food systems development over the past several decades.

Syllabus: Sociology of Knowledge and Food Systems

By Erica Morrell

What is knowledge? In this course, we will explore the rise of the authority of science across much of the globe. We will regard potential problems with and challenges to science’s dominant position, and we will analyze whether and how other forms of knowledge may shape contemporary social, cultural, and political life. Practical cases to illustrate these dynamics will draw from the food system, and we will conduct significant engagement with our local community’s emergency food system to translate theoretical concepts around knowledge into practice.

The Unexamined Securitization of Economic Migrants

By Lara Davis

In relation to migration, the 2008 Financial Crisis changed the concept of securitization, which historically describes a political process of the construction of a security threat. It is a concept that was originally coined by the Copenhagen School and academics such as Ole Waever, Barry Buzan, and Jaap de Wilde.

Syllabus: Greece & the Balkans in the 20th Century

By Juan Carmona Zabala

Greece and the Balkans have often been considered the place where Europe and the Orient—both contested categories themselves—meet and overlap. In the twentieth century, this part of the world has been the stage of geopolitical competition among world powers.

Syllabus: The Geopolitics of Central Europe

By Eamonn Butler

This course is designed to appeal to students interested in the geopolitics and international relations of the Central European region. It will provide students with the opportunity to examine the key foreign policies, geopolitical developments and international political relations of Central Europe, with specific attention given to the Visegrád countries of Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovak Republic.

Syllabus: Comparative European Politics

By Thomas Lundberg

The purpose of this course is to examine and compare the political processes, governing institutions and political economies of contemporary European societies. Through the in-depth study of country case studies, we will analyse how history has shaped the political and economic structures of these societies and the extent to which these structures determine contemporary political outcomes in both the advanced industrial democracies of the west and the transition countries of the east.

Syllabus: The International Politics of Post-Soviet Central Asia

By Luca Anceschi

This course aims to present students with an advanced introduction to the politics and international relations of post-Soviet Central Asia – a region that is here defined as the ensemble of the former Soviet republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

On Urban Research in Europe: An Interview with Pekka Tuominen

Interviewed by Eszter Gantner

In 2013, a network of urban researchers with various national and disciplinary background was founded in Berlin. This small community of committed scholars working in different fields of urban studies, had been linked by the approach of creating an interdisciplinary and transnational discursive space for a free exchange on art, public spaces, and urban activism.

Language, Affect, and Everyday Experience in Post-colonial Africa: An Interview with Janet McIntosh

Interviewed by Hélène B. Ducros

The anthropologist delves into her disciplinary approach to the study of Africa, some of her classroom pedagogical strategies, her fieldwork experience in Kenya, and her work on the dimensions of African whiteness. As she reviews issues of race, technology, language, privilege, land tenure, and national loyalty, she highlights the many layers of post-colonial plural identities and belongings.

Global Focus: An Interview with Janet Horne

Interviewed by Maria Lechtarova

The interdisciplinary lens afforded by European Studies has the potential not only to initiate a dynamic redefinition of how we study and conceive of Europe, particularly at this critical juncture in its history, but it also has the potential to be transformational in our corner of the academy.

A Digital Space to Imagine What is Possible: An Interview with Frances Negrón-Muntaner

Interviewed by Cristiana Grigore

Roma communities have a very robust oral tradition, which includes stories, history, and philosophical thought. So, in addition to providing sources, the project can also work towards a broader epistemological change by elaborating a critique of Eurocentricity, avoid the politics of respectability that promote “assimilation,” and insist on the value and importance of multiple forms of knowledge.

Teaching Europe: An Interview with Cathie Jo Martin and Vivien Schmidt

Interviewed by Briitta van Staalduinen

Today, the questions circulating among EU citizens and policymakers do not concern a deepening or expansion of the EU, but rather how the EU will move forward in a post-Brexit era. From the Eurozone crisis to the governance challenges posed by immigration, the tension between national and EU-level sovereignty has never been more apparent.

Reframing Gendered Violence at Columbia University

By Lila Abu-Lughod, Marianne Hirsch, and Jean E. Howard

Over the past few decades, violence against women (VAW) and gender-based violence (GBV) have come to prominence as loci for activism throughout the world. Both VAW and GBV regularly garner international media attention and occupy a growing place in international law and global governance.

Syllabus: Green Media and Popular Culture

By John Parham

This module looks at the media’s role in raising environmental awareness. It will also ask you to think about how far popular culture can encourage us towards applying ecological values in our everyday lives.

Cultural Heritage and Politics of the Past: An Interview with Dacia Viejo-Rose

Interviewed by Sherman Teichman

For heritage is central to understanding some of the most pressing societal issues: responses to and consequences of crisis moments, the rise of fundamentalism and xenophobia, the future of cities, the increasingly fragile social contract, tensions between universal and local visions, developing strategies towards climate change, unpacking the ever more numerous claims over historical injustices, and rebuilding fractured societies.

Syllabus: Archaeological Heritage and Museums

By Dacia Viejo-Rose 

The objective of this paper is to provide candidates with a sound knowledge about reasons for and ways of managing the past. During the course, candidates will develop a broad understanding of the diverse issues involved in heritage management, as well as an understanding of the types of agents and instruments involved.

Syllabus: 20th Century Central European Literature

By Meghan Forbes

The contested construct of Central Europe, the violence of the two world wars, and the turbulent political environment in the region throughout the twentieth century has produced a distinct body of literature that expresses both cultural specificity and a more universal tension between unease and optimism brought about by a constant state of flux.

Syllabus: European Avant-­Garde in Print

By Meghan Forbes

The period between the two world wars in Europe marked a moment of intensive artistic and intellectual exchange as new nations were formed, such as Czechoslovakia’s First Republic and Weimar Germany. This active learning course will examine how the Czech, German, Polish, Hungarian, and Serbo‐Croatian avant­‐garde magazines contributed to international discussions about what a new Europe should be through their innovative use of photography, international typographic conventions, and translation.

Syllabus: The 21st Century Worldwide Refugee Crisis

By Maria Höhn

Currently, around 60 million people across the globe are displaced by war, violence, and environmental destruction; half of them are children. This worldwide refugee crisis of forced migration is the largest displacement of people since WWII. View Maria’s course syllabus for The 21st Century Worldwide Refugee Crisis at Vasaar College.