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Syllabi

1094

Syllabus: Sustainable Water and Food Security

By Paolo D’Odorico

Since the 1960’ the human population has been increasing by one billion every 12-14 years and is projected to reach 9.5 billion by 2050. More people will require more food and water while the increasing affluence in emergent economies will further enhance human appropriation of natural resources.

Syllabus: Global Economics of Water

By Peter Debaere

Soaring food prices and the recent droughts in Australia, India and the United States underscore that freshwater scarcity is a major challenge in the 21st century. Almost one-fifth of the world’s population currently suffers the consequences of water scarcity, and this number is about to increase.

Syllabus: Forest Hydrology

By Paolo D’Odorico

This course introduces the fundamental physical principles that are necessary to understand the interactions of hydrological processes with forest ecosystems. The course focuses on hydrologic processes characteristic of forested watersheds, including the impact of forests on evapotranspiration rates, soil infiltration, soil water redistribution, shallow water table variability, runoff generation, streamflow dynamics, and soil stability and erosion.

Syllabus: Physical Hydrology

By Matt Reidenbach

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the principles governing the flow of water on and beneath the earth’s surface. This includes concepts of fluid dynamics applied to open channel flow, ground water flow, and dynamics.

Syllabus: Storm Water Management

By Teresa Culver 

Emphasizes the management of stormwater quantity and quality, especially in urban areas. Course includes impacts of stormwater on infrastructure and ecosystems, hydrologic and contaminant transport principles, stormwater regulation, structural and non-structural stormwater management approaches, and modeling tools for stormwater analysis and management.

Syllabus: Water for the World by Jim Smith

By Jim Smith

Potable water is essential for human life. Throughout most of the industrialized world, advanced water treatment systems incorporate fundamental physical, chemical, and biological principles into engineering designs to produce high-quality water at relatively low cost to consumers.

Syllabus: Fluid Mechanics

By Teresa Culver 

The emphasis in the course is on the behavior of water, including closed conduit flows and open channel flows. It is hoped each student will gain proficiency with equations of energy, momentum and force as applied to fluids.

Syllabus: Water Sustainability

By Brian Richter

In this course we will explore the dimensions of what “sustainability” and “sustainable development” mean in the context of water use and management. We will examine the different ways in which water is used, valued, and governed, examining sustainability through different lenses and perspectives.

Syllabus: The Dynamics of Oceans

By Matt Reidenbach

Studies the physical properties, processes, and structure of the oceans; mass and energy budgets; methods of measurements; and the nature and theory of ocean currents, waves, and tides in the open sea, near shore and in estuaries.

Syllabus: Sustainability Policy Design and Evaluations

By Molly Lipscomb

In this class we will discuss why sustainability is a problem, and how to measure and evaluate the trade-offs related to different environmental policy choices. We will discuss benefits and drawbacks of various traditional policy solutions such as command and control, permitting, and taxation, and we will discuss new policy tools that are gaining in use: integrated platforms, auctions, tradeable quotas.

Syllabus: Humanities Texts, Critical Skills

By Emily Bloom and Nicole Callahan

Much like the Core Curriculum, this course aims to equip students with critical tools for approaching, reading, and striving with literary and philosophical texts—ancient as well as modern.

Syllabus: Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative

By Sandra Carletti

Food and life experiences are inextricably linked. In this course, we will examine the ways in which literature uses food to represent and understand the human experience  We will focus on the various symbolic functions of food associated with the images of cooking, eating, drinking, and feasting presented in these literary works.

Syllabus: Sociology of Food

By Erica Morrell

In this course, we will learn about and apply core sociological perspectives to analyze dynamics of local, regional, national, and global agri-food systems development over the past several decades.

Syllabus: Sociology of Knowledge and Food Systems

By Erica Morrell

What is knowledge? In this course, we will explore the rise of the authority of science across much of the globe. We will regard potential problems with and challenges to science’s dominant position, and we will analyze whether and how other forms of knowledge may shape contemporary social, cultural, and political life. Practical cases to illustrate these dynamics will draw from the food system, and we will conduct significant engagement with our local community’s emergency food system to translate theoretical concepts around knowledge into practice.

Syllabus: Greece & the Balkans in the 20th Century

By Juan Carmona Zabala

Greece and the Balkans have often been considered the place where Europe and the Orient—both contested categories themselves—meet and overlap. In the twentieth century, this part of the world has been the stage of geopolitical competition among world powers.

Syllabus: The Geopolitics of Central Europe

By Eamonn Butler

This course is designed to appeal to students interested in the geopolitics and international relations of the Central European region. It will provide students with the opportunity to examine the key foreign policies, geopolitical developments and international political relations of Central Europe, with specific attention given to the Visegrád countries of Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovak Republic.

Syllabus: Comparative European Politics

By Thomas Lundberg

The purpose of this course is to examine and compare the political processes, governing institutions and political economies of contemporary European societies. Through the in-depth study of country case studies, we will analyse how history has shaped the political and economic structures of these societies and the extent to which these structures determine contemporary political outcomes in both the advanced industrial democracies of the west and the transition countries of the east.

Syllabus: The International Politics of Post-Soviet Central Asia

By Luca Anceschi

This course aims to present students with an advanced introduction to the politics and international relations of post-Soviet Central Asia – a region that is here defined as the ensemble of the former Soviet republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

Syllabus: Green Media and Popular Culture

By John Parham

This module looks at the media’s role in raising environmental awareness. It will also ask you to think about how far popular culture can encourage us towards applying ecological values in our everyday lives.

Syllabus: Archaeological Heritage and Museums

By Dacia Viejo-Rose 

The objective of this paper is to provide candidates with a sound knowledge about reasons for and ways of managing the past. During the course, candidates will develop a broad understanding of the diverse issues involved in heritage management, as well as an understanding of the types of agents and instruments involved.

Syllabus: 20th Century Central European Literature

By Meghan Forbes

The contested construct of Central Europe, the violence of the two world wars, and the turbulent political environment in the region throughout the twentieth century has produced a distinct body of literature that expresses both cultural specificity and a more universal tension between unease and optimism brought about by a constant state of flux.

Syllabus: European Avant-­Garde in Print

By Meghan Forbes

The period between the two world wars in Europe marked a moment of intensive artistic and intellectual exchange as new nations were formed, such as Czechoslovakia’s First Republic and Weimar Germany. This active learning course will examine how the Czech, German, Polish, Hungarian, and Serbo‐Croatian avant­‐garde magazines contributed to international discussions about what a new Europe should be through their innovative use of photography, international typographic conventions, and translation.

Syllabus: The 21st Century Worldwide Refugee Crisis

By Maria Höhn

Currently, around 60 million people across the globe are displaced by war, violence, and environmental destruction; half of them are children. This worldwide refugee crisis of forced migration is the largest displacement of people since WWII. View Maria’s course syllabus for The 21st Century Worldwide Refugee Crisis at Vasaar College.