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The Pedagogy of Memory: A Workshop on Teaching in an Emerging Field

By Jonathan Bach and Sara Jones

The question of teaching memory extends beyond the question of competing canons from those disciplines for whom memory tends to be a discrete object of study, such as psychology, literature, sociology, and history (though of course not limited to these). Following the spirit of the conference, we were interested in thinking about the teaching of memory from within and across such disciplines, and what it would mean to create interdisciplinary sub-fields.

Cultural Heritage and Politics of the Past: An Interview with Dacia Viejo-Rose

Interviewed by Sherman Teichman

For heritage is central to understanding some of the most pressing societal issues: responses to and consequences of crisis moments, the rise of fundamentalism and xenophobia, the future of cities, the increasingly fragile social contract, tensions between universal and local visions, developing strategies towards climate change, unpacking the ever more numerous claims over historical injustices, and rebuilding fractured societies.

Syllabus: Archaeological Heritage and Museums

By Dacia Viejo-Rose 

The objective of this paper is to provide candidates with a sound knowledge about reasons for and ways of managing the past. During the course, candidates will develop a broad understanding of the diverse issues involved in heritage management, as well as an understanding of the types of agents and instruments involved.

World War I American Immigrant Poetry: A Digital Humanities Project

By Lorie A. Vanchena

The World War I American Immigrant Poetry project at the University of Kansas creates a single source for these digitized poems as well as for accompanying scholarly annotations and contextual material. We seek to preserve these historical voices by making the poetry available online to academics, teachers, students, and the general public.

Syllabus: 20th Century Central European Literature

By Meghan Forbes

The contested construct of Central Europe, the violence of the two world wars, and the turbulent political environment in the region throughout the twentieth century has produced a distinct body of literature that expresses both cultural specificity and a more universal tension between unease and optimism brought about by a constant state of flux.

Syllabus: European Avant-­Garde in Print

By Meghan Forbes

The period between the two world wars in Europe marked a moment of intensive artistic and intellectual exchange as new nations were formed, such as Czechoslovakia’s First Republic and Weimar Germany. This active learning course will examine how the Czech, German, Polish, Hungarian, and Serbo‐Croatian avant­‐garde magazines contributed to international discussions about what a new Europe should be through their innovative use of photography, international typographic conventions, and translation.

The Mid-Hudson Refugee Solidarity Alliance

By Maria Höhn

If we want to prepare our undergraduate students for this new reality, we need to be a part of researching, analyzing, and designing curriculum innovations that give our students the capacities and skills to engage with what will be global challenge for decades to come.

Syllabus: The 21st Century Worldwide Refugee Crisis

By Maria Höhn

Currently, around 60 million people across the globe are displaced by war, violence, and environmental destruction; half of them are children. This worldwide refugee crisis of forced migration is the largest displacement of people since WWII. View Maria’s course syllabus for The 21st Century Worldwide Refugee Crisis at Vasaar College.