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Literary

677

A Difficult Death: The Life and Work of Jens Peter Jacobsen by Morten Høi Jensen

Reviewed by Marianne Stecher

It is Jensen’s crisp and concise writing and wit, which distinguish his marvelous contextualization of the intellectual, cultural, and social worlds in which Jens Peter Jacobsen moved and breathed. Jensen draws vivid portraits of the nineteenth-century literary contemporaries of Jacobsen – so that they spring from the pages.

Adua by Igiaba Scego

Reviewed by Yasmin Roshanian

Adua dreams of a place where the taboos surrounding sex, romantic idealism, and uninhibited aesthetic pleasures are not censored or damned.

The Outlaw by Jón Gnarr, translated from the Icelandic by Lytton Smith

Reviewed by K.T. Billey

Translated by Lytton Smith, the third and final volume in Gnarr’s autobiographical trilogy is a glimpse into a sensitive, often miserable teenage mind. Devastating candor pulls the reader into the emotional whirlpool of a young thinker as he grapples with normalcy, loneliness, his own limitations, and life’s unexpected possibilities.

Measures of Expatriation by Vahni Capildeo

Reviewed by Theophilus Kwek

Throughout the nineteenth century, as the British Empire and its official tongue extended across the world, the word “expatriate,” which, as late as 1818 referred to “one who has been banished,” acquired a new definition: “one who chooses to live abroad.”

Prosopopoeia by Farid Tali

Reviewed by Poupeh Missaghi

Farid Tali’s Prosopopoeia is a gorgeous memorial for a lost loved one, from one brother to another, from one man who finds beauty and love in the arms of another man.